What is happening to the Home Loans Market?

A 2013 survey (Belden and Russonello, America-in-2013-Final Report.PDF) showed that the demand for home ownership is very high, in spite of various difficulties experienced by the housing market. Most believe that home ownership is a good investment for them. Seventy percent of renters hope to buy homes within five years. Many people who own homes are looking for larger homes.

Demand for homes:

Qualifying for a home loan is part of the life cycle of Americans. The youngest generation (age 28 to 34) show the strongest preference for mixed use urban communities in the city. They want walkable communities and public transit. When people move into the 35 to 47 age group (the married and child-rearing phase), they begin to prefer to buy single-family homes. The older baby-boomer generation have diversified into a wide range of housing sizes and communities. They generally feel settled, except that some want to move into smaller homes with shorter transportation demand, close to parks and far from neighbors.

The need for home loans is a constant through all the varieties of location and need. According to the survey,

Living in a single-family house is…related…to their stage of in life. It is a goal that Americans move closer to as the age, marry, and earn more.”

Young adults in the millennial generation are heavily burdened by student loan debt.  A Wells-Fargo survey found that a majority of millennials (54 percent) describe debt as their biggest financial concern. Forty-two percent of millennials say their debt is “overwhelming.” Of the millennial generation 64 percent financed their education with student loans. This contrasts with baby boomers, of whom only 29 percent financed their education with loans, during a period when tuition costs and fees were much lower.

Millennials in the marketplace:

When millennials are ready to finance a home, what is the home finance market like for them? In 2013, 30 year-olds were as likely to be stuck in their childhood bedrooms as they were to own their own home. The job market was especially hard on millennials with unemployment rates at 14 percent for that group between 2007 and 2010. For many, saving and handling student debt were very hard.

With  the gradual recovery of the job market, the “household formation rates” (how many new household units–home buying units–are being formed) has reached close to normal levels. Normally this would signal a normalizing housing market. However, the people forming new households are disproportionally not millennials.

Surprisingly, even with improving conditions, the share of adults in the millennial age range living with their parents has continued to rise. The rate at which millennials get married or live with a partner has been decreasing for many years now, independent of the recession. Millennials, employed or not, are more likely than ever to live with parents and not form independent households. The increases in household formation is coming from older adults. Many feel that fewer households entering the home buying market is due to later marriages and not-good-enough jobs, as well as student debt.

Preparing Better Mortgages to Tempt Millennials:

The worry felt by many borrowers has to do in part with hidden costs of the mortgage. Over the last few years, the household lending industry has been borrowing the practice of Total Cost of Ownership from industrial management practice. Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) was popularized for business in 1987. The Total cost analysis in mortgage lending enables lenders to explore what their resources can afford in a home mortgage. This analysis treats home ownership as a cost-benefit proposition.

Looking at all the factors that go into mortgage cost gives purchasers a sense of closure and allays fears of the unknown. As will any Total Cost of Ownership calculation, the total mortgage cost analysis begins looking at all the factors that go into the cost of the mortgage:

  • Mortgage attributes–for a fixed rate mortgage: loan amount, loan term, and interest rates. For a variable rate mortgage: periodic rate cap, lifetime rate cap, months between rate adjustment, etc..
  • Down payment–the larger the down payment, the smaller the total mortgage costs. Recent government regulations permit down payments of 1 percent. What would such a small down payment mean for total cost?
  • Discount points–upfront fees paid to the lender.
  • Other closing costs–a multitude of upfront expenses for inspections, legal and document fees, surveys, etc..
  • Private mortgage insurance–usually around $55 per month for every $100,000 borrowed, until the remaining principle falls below 80 percent of the home’s fair market value.
  • Income tax ramifications–some mortgage expenses may be tax-deductible.

Pacific Mortgage Group makes it easy and stress-free for you to find a mortgage option that truly fits your needs. Our mission is to match you with the best possible home loan package so you can achieve your financial goals. Please contact us to learn more.